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Windows Store revises guidelines to support 'Mature' games
Windows Store revises guidelines to support 'Mature' games
October 25, 2012 | By Tom Curtis

October 25, 2012 | By Tom Curtis
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Windows 8 has taken a lot of flak recently over a policy that banned all apps rated higher than PEGI 16 from the Windows Store, though Microsoft recently decided to revise its regulations to be more inclusive of mature-rated games.

Under the original Windows Store policy, games that have earned a PEGI 18 rating in the UK would not be allowed on the proprietary Windows 8 marketplace. That means that major titles such as Skyrim, Max Payne 3, Borderlands 2, and others simply wouldn't be available through the service.

Of course, Windows 8 users would still be able to purchase these and other PEGI 18 rated games through Steam or other vendors, but that original policy left an odd gap in the upcoming Windows Store catalog.

"[The old policy] basically ends up disqualifying games that would be ESRB Mature," Windows Corporate VP of web services Antoine Leblond told Gizmodo. With the new policy, Microsoft plans to allow those "Mature" games on the Windows Store. Games rated ESRB Adult or games only rated PEGI 18, meanwhile, will still be barred from the marketplace.

Gizmodo reports that this new policy will take some time to go into effect. At the moment, Microsoft plans to make the change in December, but until then, games rated higher than PEGI 16 won't be available on the Windows Store (which launches tomorrow, October 26).


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Comments


Alan Rimkeit
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That is a good step for Windows 8. Now if I did not despise the UI for the new Windows 8 GUI. Metro is terrible. I think this was a good thing for sites like Gamasutra to raise such a ruckus about the issue. Bravo Gamasutra and other sites like Kotaku.

Rey Samonte
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I don't mind metro on my phone. But for my desktop? YUCK! It just doesn't look good on bigger screens. Makes me feel big and dumb....err....wait. ;)

But seriously, not a fan of metro on the bigger displays.

Alan Rimkeit
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I have not used it on mobile, but if you say it is cool then I am interested. I hope it is good for mobile as I want it to be a good alternative to the Empire of Apple.

Craig Timpany
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It's all a half measure until the signing infrastructure supports alternative app stores, ala Android.

Harlan Sumgui
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Yup because they can still reject [i]any[/i] app that they want to and they don't have to give you a reason as to why, just like with the iOS store. It's not as if there is going to be an appeals court where a dev could force ms to put an app on their store.

Eric Pobirs
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It is not a technical issue. It's a policy issue. Google allows alternative app stores because they cannot do anything to stop them and continue having Android be a do whatever you like platform. Consider how many Android based products are out there that don't offer the Google Play store and substitute their own, especially Amazon. Google tries to encourage the use of a setup that gets Google Play in front of more consumers but since anyone can roll their own Android variant there is little point in trying lock out other stores on devices using the Android branding. Doing otherwise runs the risk of having every big CE brand rolling their own variant with its own store. You'd have LG OS, Samsung OS, Sony Ericsson OS, etc. that would all be Android under the hood and leave Google out of the software revenue.

As Windows RT and Windows 8 are not OSS they can impose restrictions while still licensing to various OEMs. At the far end you have Apple, offering its OS solely on its own hardware. Developers will make money on all three and every one that chooses to support just one will have strong reasons for doing so.

There are some of the hard choices one must make when doing a product. There is no one path that will satisfy all developers and consumers.


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