Gamasutra: The Art & Business of Making Gamesspacer
View All     RSS
July 22, 2014
arrowPress Releases
July 22, 2014
PR Newswire
View All





If you enjoy reading this site, you might also want to check out these UBM Tech sites:


Ouya Kickstarter finishes with $8.6 million in pledges
Ouya Kickstarter finishes with $8.6 million in pledges
August 9, 2012 | By Mike Rose

August 9, 2012 | By Mike Rose
Comments
    20 comments
More:



Newsbrief: The Kickstarter crowd-funding project for the Ouya, an upcoming open, accessible Android OS games console, ended today with nearly $8.6 million collected in pledges.

The proposed console was detailed last month, with the team looking for $950,000 through Kickstarter funding. The project quickly surged past that total, with around 60,000 people pre-ordering the hardware.

The Ouya has received plenty of support from developers since it was first detailed. Robert Bowling, previously Infinity Ward's Call of Duty creative strategist, is bringing the first game from his new company Robotoki to the Android OS console, while OnLive and Square Enix have both also shown their support for the console.


Related Jobs

Cloud Imperium Games
Cloud Imperium Games — Santa Monica, California, United States
[07.22.14]

Art Outsourcing Manager
Respawn Entertainment
Respawn Entertainment — San Fernando Valley, California, United States
[07.22.14]

Senior Systems Designer
Petroglyph Games
Petroglyph Games — Las Vegas, Nevada, United States
[07.22.14]

Senior Unity Artist
Sony Online Entertainment, San Diego
Sony Online Entertainment, San Diego — San Diego, California, United States
[07.22.14]

Intermediate and Senior Database Tools Programmers










Comments


Ujn Hunter
profile image
Pray that this wasn't just the biggest highway robbery ever committed on the internet. #SayNoToVaporware

Todd Boyd
profile image
Everything is vaporware until it actually materializes. Don't be so negative. :(

Ujn Hunter
profile image
Oh... don't get me wrong... I'd love for this to materialize. I'd probably buy one if it did. I just wouldn't want to fork out $100-300 for something that I may never see. People tend to think that they are "buying" something on Kickstarter and for $8.6 million dollars, I don't blame them... just hope they are prepared for the worst.

Carl Chavez
profile image
I'm surprised people still think it will be vaporware. Considering some of the big names that have announced support at launch, it's very unlikely that it won't be released since those companies would probably want to verify its existence before committing to a press release.

Michael Rooney
profile image
@Todd: A lot of kickstarters have fully functioning prototypes that just need to be manufactured. Ouya seems to still be incomplete. At least it seemed that way when the kickstarter started.

Not to say it won't ever be complete, but a lot of Kickstarters are a lot further along than Ouya was when it's kickstarter launched. Lots of good examples in the board/card game kickstarters; that's where I put most of my kickstarter money :)

Michael Pianta
profile image
I think this is pretty impressive. I'm looking forward to seeing how this goes.

E Zachary Knight
profile image
I am looking forward to getting one. Although I was not able to get in on any of the developer packages, I will be developing my next game with the prospect of releasing on the Ouya kept in mind.

Joel Camp
profile image
I admit, like Ujn I thought Ouya was probably a scam at first but then I started looking into it and decided that it had the potential turn the console industry on its head. When I came to that realization donating was an easy decision especially with the support of OnLive and Square Enix.

Joe Wreschnig
profile image
Have they released any real information about what "open" means yet? Or are they still riding the wave of mass cluelessness about "free games and $100 console" on one hand and "OPEN OPEN OPEN OPEN [but don't look too hard at our undetailed approval process, no information about the SDK other than vague 'Android', and by the way rooting gets you kicked off the store]" on the other?

I would love a $100 open console. I still see no evidence this will be it.

Kellam Templeton-Smith
profile image
I keep seeing "OUR GAMES OUR 100% FREE!" plus "DEVELOPERS GET 70% OF THE PROFITS OFF OUR FREE GAMES!".

People have paid their hundred bucks with only a vague notion for what they're getting.

In the opposite direction, you have the Oculus Rift; They explicitly state that this is primarily for developers, and you'd basically be spending $300 for a DOOM3 headset if you get it now.

David Marcum
profile image
Are you certain that a rooted cosole will get you kicked off the store? This is the last I heard about it. And it doesn't contradict what you said, but it doesn't support it either.

Q:How much freedom exactly do we have with this console? (i.e. Custom OS, homebrew, etc.) Its just "open source" seems to have different meanings to different people.

Julie Uhrman:
You’re absolutely right. You’ll be able to access the base hardware, and hack the OS as well. We’re figuring out which elements to make changeable when the console is rooted (we’ve heard a lot of people want to keep access to the store).

http://tinyurl.com/c4tnq47

Joe Wreschnig
profile image
@David,

http://kotaku.com/5924657/an-all+star-plan-to-build-a-new-99-hack
able-video-game-console-requires-950000-of-your-money has an interview with Julie Uhrman where she says "Obviously if a hacker roots the device, our integrated user experience and game store will no longer be available while the device is rooted"

I guess your answer is later, but also vaguer. The "obviously" bothers me most. It's not at all obvious that rooting should remove store access (it doesn't on any other device). It gets more confusing when you read that the developer model is also described as "A first-run OUYA (already rooted so you can just get going)".

Basically, they're using a word inconsistently and in a way I definitely can't trust them, and everything they say just makes it more confusing. One thing is clear in all of them is that openness is more a marketing push than a real ideological commitment.

Kellam Templeton-Smith
profile image
I'm politely waiting to see what happens.

They've basically promised us the moon, and are going to have a hard time delivering on their hyperbole (it's effective though-the amount of people crowing that a comparable gaming rig would cost 1-2k to build is sickening).

Joel McIntyre
profile image
Yes, I don't think the hardware is what their success hinges on - they will live and die on their full story of delivering plug & play wireless controllers & console hooked up to the TV, on a hacker's delight platform. The hardware is just the means to that end. Actually, that is true for all consoles, otherwise a PC with a wireless gamepad would have destroyed the console market years ago - after all, it's fully moddable, several OSs are available, and it's as powerful as you can make it - but it's just not a good generic living room gaming solution.

Joel McIntyre
profile image
I could be one of the clueless surprised masses, I suppose, but they definitely said things like "working electronic prototype" and "working on industrial design and final layout before placing the the manufacturing orders" before I committed my kickstarter preorder funding. As long as they aren't lying, it sounds good, and I'm OK if they don't hit their early 2013 time target, as long as it doesn't turn into 2015.

As for "android api" being mysterious, again barring clulessness on my part, I've previously downloaded the Android dev tools and API and fooled around with them. It never occurred to me they would mean something different that that, maybe plus a library one might have to pay money for to deal more directly with hardware or maybe even run custom games. What else could "Android API" mean than the one Google provides?

But I do agree "open" doesn't mean free games; from their comments it means we are welcome to add hardware, root the Android OS, install hacked OSs, install whatever software we feel like... Meanwhile, "free to play" I take to mean "free game demos/starter levels" and the option for publishers and individuals to make full games available for free.

Joe Wreschnig
profile image
Oh, no, I'm not at all worried they'll fail to deliver some physical product within their stated timeframe (or at the most, fashionably late). The hardware is pretty unambitious (again, it's just a Nexus 7 in a not-so-fancy box) and the people involved are not scam artists. So I don't see the thing failing to *ship*, but shipping doesn't make it an open platform or consumer market or a usable SDK.

If I want a $100 computer to just install whatever I want on, I can get e.g. an RPi. It's only got value if I can root it *and* keep using it as a console, and they've made conflicting statements as to whether that's possible. They've also made statements implying to do any development you'll have to root it - which is unusual (you don't have to root any other console or phone to develop games/apps for it, with the official SDKs). And they've said "open market" but obviously there's going to be some approval process since they've also said they're going to force some kind of F2P, and without details of the approval process that makes it sound less open than the Android Market or iOS App Store.

And none of this got clarified during the Kickstarter process (but they did announce adding an Ethernet port, a thing useless enough even the Wii didn't bother shipping with one).

Aaron Fowler
profile image
I'd prefer to count my chickens after they hatch.

I'll buy one If it turns out to be the next big thing. Until then, I can live with not being the first to jump on board.

Eugene Zhukov
profile image
Most of commenters here are quite skeptic or accurate in their awaiting, and I LIKE IT :)) It means everything is not so bad with us, game developers. Cause my strong opinion - OUYA is a kind of bubble, based on philistines' cluelessness. We got dozens of messages from OUYA's fever adherents, who asked: "Are you guys planning to port your game to OUYA?" Huh ... 3D game with complex physics, which main gameplay feature is detailed demolition of complex and compound 3D objects in open space ... to port this to Android smartphone for $100 bucks? LOL I guess, those folks have no idea about the difference between smartphone (what actually OUYA is) and powerful Mac or PC asking for this.

Alex Zieba
profile image
With its open source piratability and free-to-play angle the Ouya will make definitely make a splash. But I am not sure if it will do so in a good way. http://youtu.be/SrNSqpcNRZw

Michael Joseph
profile image
I'd like to know how many/much Google employees donated. LOL.


none
 
Comment: