Gamasutra is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them. Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.


Gamasutra: The Art & Business of Making Gamesspacer
View All     RSS
June 17, 2019
arrowPress Releases








If you enjoy reading this site, you might also want to check out these UBM Tech sites:


This Week in Video Game Criticism: From  Stick Shift  to Nintendo's lenticular design

This Week in Video Game Criticism: From Stick Shift to Nintendo's lenticular design

April 6, 2015 | By Kris Ligman

April 6, 2015 | By Kris Ligman
Comments
    1 comments
More: Console/PC, Indie, Design



This week, our partnership with game criticism site Critical Distance brings us picks from Kris Ligman on topics ranging from the lenticular design of Nintendo games to the (literal) autoeroticism of Robert Yang's Stick Shift.

Systems and Beyond Systems

On First Person Scholar, Gino Grieco has produced a stellar essay on the lenticular design of Nintendo games -- and also Magic: The Gathering.

Meanwhile, at Videogame Tourism, Kent Sheely has an interesting piece up on the recent revival of games with rules and conditions mediated by the player. A world away and yet in a strikingly similar vein, we have Eurogamer's Robert Purchese writing about Eve Online again, namely on why it is Eve's metagame of its economy and alliances which make it so much larger than life. It also fits in nicely with this piece by Austin Walker on Clockwork Worlds, about the metagames and in-character/out-of-character dynamics which play considerably into what we often call "immersion."

Speaking of resuscitations of some fraught game design terms, Roland of 9pp pens a short-and-sweet piece on the medium specificity of games, without invoking a wishy-washy word like "interactivity." Namely, Roland says, it is about games' ability to both offer control and depict its loss.

Next we move over to The Guardian where Simon Parkin, in his characteristic style, paints a compelling portrait of Dark Souls and Bloodborne director Hidetaka Miyazaki, whose unconventional entry into the Japanese games industry makes him an unusual success story. And keeping with the focus on Japanese games, on Metopal Nathan Altice offers a fascinating analysis of the time dilation and compression functions of J-RPGs, and in particular Square-Enix's Bravely Default:

Though many RPGs stretching back to the 80s have a Charge, Wait, or Defend option, I've never seen them used as a temporal modifier, nor have I seen their opposite function used as a play mechanic. Strategically using multiple stacked Braves [advance actions] can end battles after one party member's turn. Effectively, that member's battle timeline is operating independent of both their combatants' and allies' battle timelines, as if they have a time machine transporting future selves to the present in hopes that they will erase a possible future where the enemies are still alive. It's conceptually mind-bending, but works smoothly in practice.

In the Creases

At Wizard of Radical, Ray Porreca has embarked on a touching letter series on childhood memories of videogames with his incarcerated brother.

World Autism Awareness Day occurred this past week, and at Polygon Joe Parlock surveys several games depicting autistic characters, finding most of them wanting. Going a step further, at Vice, Jake Tucker (who like Parlock is on the autism spectrum himself) relates how L.A. Noire inadvertently created a player character who seems to share his disability.

Anita Sarkeesian's Feminist Frequency has launched the first in a new series highlighting positive, strong, and unique representations of women in games, which is certainly worth a look.

At Video Game Researcher, Wai Yen Tang has drawn up an interesting condensation of several research studies seeking to identify the (manifold) reasons women are not equally represented in STEM fields and game development. Coming at it from a player and industry perspective, Tegiminis responds to the assertion that women "naturally" prefer different games than men, arguing that to treat the push for better representation in the core market as "cultural colonialism" is, at the very least, misguided:

The framing of our new conversation on games as cultural colonialism is appalling on just about every level. Asking for games to mature in their treatment of women and minorities is, and it's comically absurd that this even needs to be said, not colonialism. […] This isn't colonialism, it's maturation. Games aren't being colonized because everybody who is saying these things was already here.

Defying Gravity

At his development blog, independent designer and games instructor Robert Yang goes into the development process of his game Stick Shift, in which the player participates in erotically stimulating... well, exactly what it says on the tin. It's a fascinating exploration of both social-political metaphor and alien phenomenology, considering that, as Yang says, "this is arousal on the car's terms."

At Hopes and Fears, Joe Bernardi details the lasting impact of Dogma 99, a Scandinavian LARP scene aimed at reducing the artifice and barrier for entry to live action roleplay.

Lastly, at the ever-delightful Offworld, the equally delightful Katherine Cross reviews Gravity Ghost, a small and accessible game best played by letting go:

I stopped trying to tightly control my orbit and instead relaxed into the gravity of the little planet that I'd been fighting this whole time. I stopped seeing Iona as a superheroine battling against an impossible power and yielded to it instead, embodying her trust and turning her into a ghostly moon swinging in the arms of a larger force. [...] There was no hurry, no clock to beat but my own. I'd find a way, gravity would find a way. Ultimately, the solution was simple: I had to stop treating Gravity Ghost like every other game I'd played.

Footer Business

Thanks for reading! As always, we greatly appreciate your submissions through email or by Twitter mention! And yes, we welcome (and encourage!) self-submission, so don't be shy.

A bit of the usual footer business: the April Blogs of the Round Table is here with the prompt "Palette Swap" which should be promising. Also, we've released our March BoRT roundup for "Extended Play," our latest March This Month in Let's Plays roundup is live, and we have two new podcast episodes with Anna Anthropy and Polygon's Danielle Riendeau, respectively! Whew!

Critical Distance is proud to be completely funded by our readership. If you like what we do and want to help us continue to expand, consider pledging a small monthly donation of your own! It would help us a lot!



Related Jobs

Sucker Punch Productions
Sucker Punch Productions — Bellevue, Washington, United States
[06.16.19]

QA Manager
Legends of Learning
Legends of Learning — Washington, DC, District of Columbia, United States
[06.14.19]

Senior Unity Engineer - $140k - Remote OK
Cold Iron Studios
Cold Iron Studios — San Jose, California, United States
[06.13.19]

Senior World Builder
Cold Iron Studios
Cold Iron Studios — San Jose, California, United States
[06.13.19]

Senior Content Designer









Loading Comments

loader image