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October 19, 2019
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Jayelinda Suridge's Blog   Expert Blogs

 

Jayelinda is a game developer inWellington, New Zealand. Before going solo, she worked for five years in the games industry on titles for PC, mobile and a variety of gaming consoles. She also wrote the game engine behind the upcoming car company tycoon game, Automation. Trained in both 3D art and games programming, she is happiest messing around with shaders and visual effects.

Jayelinda’s first solo project was Min Min, a 3D flying game for Android mobile devices. Ludus silva, an ecological, forest strategy game, is her second, and rather more ambitious endeavour.

 

Expert Blogs

Posted by Jayelinda Suridge on Thu, 13 Nov 2014 08:52:00 EST in Programming, Console/PC, Indie, Smartphone/Tablet
A very common application for procedural mesh generation is terrain. We are going to have a look at some simple ways of generating terrain meshes.


Posted by Jayelinda Suridge on Thu, 05 Sep 2013 04:48:00 EDT in
An introduction to procedural geometry. Part 2A: Making cylinders interesting. Now we have some more interesting building blocks. Importantly, we now have the ability to make things with curves. This opens the door to so many shapes found in nature.


Posted by Jayelinda Suridge on Thu, 05 Sep 2013 04:35:00 EDT in Programming, Serious
An introduction to procedural geometry. Part 2A: The cylinder. Welcome to part two. This is where we move on to our second basic shape: the cylinder.


Posted by Jayelinda Suridge on Tue, 03 Sep 2013 08:59:00 EDT in Programming, Serious
An introduction to procedural geometry. Part 1B: Making planes interesting. In the first part of this tutorial we learned to make planes and boxes. Those are basic building blocks. Blocks that can be combined and extended in all kinds of interesting ways.


Posted by Jayelinda Suridge on Tue, 03 Sep 2013 05:32:00 EDT in Programming, Serious
An introduction to procedural geometry. Part 1A: The plane. Procedural geometry is geometry modelled in code. Instead of building 3D meshes by hand using art software such as Maya, 3DS Max or Blender, the mesh is built using programmed instructions.



Jayelinda Suridge's Comments

Comment In: [Blog - 09/05/2013 - 04:35]

They are also much harder ...

They are also much harder to work with and manage, especially as geometry gets more complicated. Plus Unity requires indexed triangles anyway, so the only way to teach strips and fans would be to give a tutorial on writing a rendering engine. That 's a little out of scope for ...

Comment In: [Blog - 09/03/2013 - 08:59]

To apply a noise to ...

To apply a noise to a sphere, you 'd use noise to offset the radius of the sphere before generating the vertex position radius noiseValue . Object placement on the surface works the same way. r n r nSpheres get covered in the next tutorial, however, if you 're distorting ...