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 Angry Birds  Study Shows Males More Likely To Convert
Angry Birds Study Shows Males More Likely To Convert
September 12, 2011 | By Frank Cifaldi

September 12, 2011 | By Frank Cifaldi
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    6 comments
More: Smartphone/Tablet, Business/Marketing



Male game players are 35 percent more likely than females to convert from the free version of Angry Birds to the paid version.

That's according to market research firm Ask Your Target Market (AYTM), which recently published the results of a 1,000-person survey specifically about the spending habits of Angry Birds players.

Specifically, males 18-24 are the most likely to convert: 29 percent more so than 25+, 32 percent more than 18-24 females, and 76 percent more than the game's lowest-converting demographic, females over 25.

The survey also measured how many versions of the game (there are currently three: Angry Birds, Angry Birds Seasons and Angry Birds Rio) each respondant had installed on their device of choice. Of those who have played the game more than 25 times, 38 percent claimed to have the free versions of all three games installed, suggesting a healthy cross-promotional campaign from publisher Rovio.

The survey also measured platforms, player moods, and whether respondents felt "addicted" to the title.

More stats are available in an infographic here.

With the massive runaway success of the franchise, publisher Rovio is keeping an increasingly close watch on its player statistics. Last month it announced that it had licensed a leading analytics platform from Medio Systems, which will give it a better understanding of its players' habits.


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Comments


Cheng Ling
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I knew Angry Birds was sexist!

Megan Fox
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Self-reported studies mean very little. Given that we know that men are on average more likely to be core gamers than women, and thus perhaps more focused on gaming as a hobby, this could simply be a result related to such. "This just in! Those that view gaming as a hobby more likely to buy games than those that view gaming as a rare time-filling activity!"



... but hey, I mean they made a graph and everything, so clearly these numbers mean something! ;)

Fiore Iantosca
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Male here and I still don't own nor played Angry Birds. Take that!

Cartrell Hampton
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Hey.



Same here. Not interested in this game.



- Ziro out.

John Martins
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So basically... a lot of gamers happen to be male and aged between 18 and 25. Newsflash of the year!

Joe Cooper
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It's just some data for use in spending ad dollars. Nothing to get defensive or snipe about. It has no predictive power over a given individual and clearly the data does not suggest a given man will have bought Angry Birds or have any interest.



If taken at face value, it says that if you put this game in front of various people, men are somewhat more likely to be interested, and this might direct ad dollars.



I realize people get uppity about this because they know somewhere that some twit is thinking "this reaffirms my view that the womans belong in the kitchen!" but let's not direct that energy towards mindless data. It is a poison pill.


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