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Ouya hits its first milestone: Devkits shipping on time in December
Ouya hits its first milestone: Devkits shipping on time in December
November 30, 2012 | By Frank Cifaldi




Missing release dates is one way to make Kickstarter backers lose faith in the platform, but luckily the highest-profile project in its video games category is meeting its first milestone right on schedule.

Ouya announced today that devkits for its Android-based console will start shipping on December 28, narrowly avoiding missing the December deadline promised in its Kickstarter campaign.

The company also says its SDK should be available via a web portal around the time that the devkits themselves ship.

Additionally, Ouya says that it has a dedicated team working on the Ouya's UI, including optimizing its search and discovery for players, an issue the company was quiet about for some time.

More on the Ouya blog.


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Comments


Aaron San Filippo
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Impressed!

Keith Nemitz
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"Has chance. Has chance. This guy says the horse, 'Has chance.'"

Cordero W
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This is going to be the most fun console ever!

See, what I would do is place it down onto a hockey table. Me and three others will place their own Ouyas down at their sides of the table, and we take turns sliding our Ouyas across the table to see if it can hit the others. Basically, the goal of the game is to hit all three Ouyas into one person's goal, which is signified by a drawn arc line on their side. To add tension to the game, the other players will have to balance keeping the others from winning by planning their Ouya placements when striking them, sort of like pool. The first person to lose ends up having to take all four of them home.

And there you go! I just made the Ouya fun to play!

Amir Barak
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Sounds like the kind of game best played under a bridge! count me in :D

evan c
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I'm contemplating buying an Android TV box that I saw in a local mall. Now I'm wondering how the Ouya is different from that device?

Aaron San Filippo
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Does it come with a game controller?

evan c
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I think the remote can be held side ways like a Wii controller. I guess the advantage of the Ouya is that it has a gamepad out of the box.

Justin Sawchuk
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I am going to get one its only $100. Wow

k s
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I can hardly wait until April when we can all get one and start playing around with it.

Joe McIntosh
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"...Narrowly avoided missing the deadline..."

Oh, you mean they were on time.

Frank Cifaldi
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Yes. Just like the headline says.

Maria Jayne
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@Joe

It's another way of saying "nearly failed". Glass is always half empty stuff.

Leon T
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This one will be interesting to watch. I think the appeal of ios/android games is that they are on portables like smart phones and tablets. This is cheap enough for some people to buy on a whim, but a roku is cheaper and plays ios and android apps. The newest roku even comes with a motion controller for games.

The cheapening last gen consoles of the Wii/360/PS3 that have big libraries of cheap popular games is also a problem. There is also the shiny new consoles like the Wii U and building buzz of the PS4 & Xbox 720. Well it is just a crowded market and I can't want to see if this thing can find a spot to fit in or maybe more.

Aiden Eades
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I've got one on pre-order, missed backing the project because, like many, I liked the idea but wasn't convinced. Although I'm going to be honest here I have no intention of using it as a games console.

Originally I had plans to make a mini cluster to test cluster performance out of raspberry pis. A home project out of boredom, realized very quickly that the rasp pi didn't have enough memory to make it overly useful in a cluster format so gave up. (and having my order fail to arrive 5 weeks after expected delivery didn't help either). Saw Ouya and it ticks all the boxes for my server cluster idea. Grab one now to experiment with, create a little wooden box to stack 4 of them in. Set up Arch linux on the first and get an nginX server running with mono and nothing else, then add other Ouya as and when I can afford them.

Michael Rooney
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Why do you need so much ram? D:

Roger Tober
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It will be interesting to see if they get to a critical mass, where indie developers take it seriously. One problem I see is that a controller game and a touch game require very different development, and most developers are going to look for multi-platform distribution. I'm sure they will get quite a few amateurs, and that can be exciting. Microsoft hasn't been very encouraging to amateurs on the xbox lately.

James Coote
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OUYA seems to be channeling a lot of cynicism. A lot of that comes from kickstarter: OUYA being a big kickstarter beneficiary, it becomes a big target for kickstarter detractors. Also those in the industry that have been screwed over by the rise of mobile, and OUYA comes along and says it wants to do the same in the console space.

It's easy to say "It'll never work" and later on "I told you so", or "well I guess they got lucky"

Michael Rooney
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I don't think that's why it has detractors at all. None of the reasons you list are reasons I did not support it. The big reasons for me are the following:

1. They tout being open, but are unclear how open you can be and maintain being part of their ecosystem. They also tend to be of the GPL open rather than the MIT open ideology, which I am not a fan of.
2. They didn't have a functional prototype when they launched their kickstarter.
3. Afaik they still don't have set costs for developers to plan business viability off of. Pretty sure it's rumored 70-30, which is standard, but I don't think they've announced officially, which is a problem when you are talking about projecting costs to support a business.
4. Ouya is releasing dev kits 3 months before launching the system. This is not enough time.
5. Ouya is releasing into a hugely competitive market that is only getting more competitive. It has to compete with last gen consoles with lower price points and next gen consoles as well as tablets and phones that can hook up to TVs, have controller support, have larger software libraries, and are going to be more powerful.

PA has a good writeup that I generally agree with.

http://penny-arcade.com/report/editorial-article/the-reality-of-t
he-ouya-console-doesnt-match-the-hype-why-you-should-be-ske

I wish them the best of luck, but I think it's important to be critical as the worst case scenario is very bad.

E Zachary Knight
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Michael,

At least in response to your point 4, The time issue is only a problem for those creating a game from scratch after getting the console. For those who have been planning since the Kickstarter, that 3 months is spent fine tuning the game to work with the Ouya specifics as the rest of the game was designed based off an Android tablet of the same specs.

There is also the fact that Unity has support for the Ouya and those using it will have a much easier time getting their games up and running in that 3 month window.

That is not to say that there won't be late game releases and such, but that it is not a doomsday scenario in the slightest.

James Coote
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I'm saying why people hate it, not why people think it won't work.

You're right that it comes into a very crowded marketplace, but the worry for me is that too many developers will be chasing not enough customers. I think OUYA should spent on more conventional marketing. I know people who would love it, but had never heard of it

Also, It was confirmed some time ago it would be 70-30 split, and if as Mr Knight points out, you've been developing for android, you're used to the idea of the not-entirely-open ecosystem

Michael Rooney
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@"At least in response to your point 4, The time issue is only a problem for those creating a game from scratch after getting the console. For those who have been planning since the Kickstarter, that 3 months is spent fine tuning the game to work with the Ouya specifics as the rest of the game was designed based off an Android tablet of the same specs.

There is also the fact that Unity has support for the Ouya and those using it will have a much easier time getting their games up and running in that 3 month window."

I really think you should not underestimate the amount of time doing platform specific optimizations. Ideally you would take less than a month doing it, but depending on the size of your team it can take a good while just doing platform optimizations.

This time also includes whatever cert process Ouya will have. It seems like they are setting themselves up to have a slow start out of the gate. Maybe they've gotten some dev kits out sooner so they can launch with some good exclusives off the bat; I'd hope so anyway.

"You're right that it comes into a very crowded marketplace, but the worry for me is that too many developers will be chasing not enough customers. I think OUYA should spent on more conventional marketing. I know people who would love it, but had never heard of it"

That's another legitimate problem. It could be slightly temperred by being android based so porting should theoretically be simple, but often developers won't even do simple ports if the market doesn't justify it.

edit: Also is it just me or is the touch screen on the controller smaller than the one they showed originally? I thought it was pitched having a screen about the same as a mid size cell phone, but it looks so small on the controller they have now.

E Zachary Knight
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I am pretty excited about the console. Unfortunately, I was not able to get on board with a developer kit so I will have to wait til March to get mine. That is unless I happen to get one of the 10 free dev kits later this month. I think that is a great promotion.

But I am definitely looking forward to making games for this. I have many ideas and hope to get started soon.


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