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Disney reveals  Epic Mickey 2 , a co-op musical
Disney reveals Epic Mickey 2, a co-op musical
March 21, 2012 | By Tom Curtis

March 21, 2012 | By Tom Curtis
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More: Console/PC, Business/Marketing



Disney and the Warren Spector-led studio Junction Point have revealed that they are working on a sequel to the 2010 platformer Epic Mickey. Unlike the original Wii-exclusive title, however, this new game will debut across all three major consoles, and in an unusual twist, will even serve as a full-fledged musical.

The game, titled Disney Epic Mickey: The Power of Two, will add voiceovers and co-op to the series, and will feature songs written by Jim Dooley and Mike Himelstein, the composer and lyricist for the upcoming animated film Dorothy of Oz.

"I'm such a geek about musicals," said Spector in an interview with the Associated Press. "I love the co-op and next-gen stuff, but for me, when a character breaks into song, which they do on a regular basis in this game, it's magic."

Among those singing characters is Mickey's long-lost predecessor, Oswald the Lucky Rabbit. The character, who co-starred in the original title, has never spoken an actual word, but will speak for the first time ever in The Power of Two.

Spector also explained that he hopes to fix some of the original title's most glaring issues -- namely, it's unruly camera control. He explained that his team has been working hard on fixing its previous errors ever since the original game debuted.

"We've had a team working on the camera from literally the day we finished the first game," he said. "They'll be working on it until the day we ship the second game. [There have been] over 1,000 specific changes made to the camera. Our goal is that you will not have to touch the manual camera controls even once to play through the main story path of this game."

The original Epic Mickey released to largely positive reviews, with critics praising the title for its celebration of Disney history and its unusual morality system. Others, however, said the title's repetitive content hindered the impact of its more exciting ideas.

Disney Epic Mickey: The Power of Two does not yet have a target release window, but the title is due to launch on Wii, PlayStation 3, and Xbox 360.


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Comments


Daye Williams
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I blame the camera issues on Gamebryo. it's such a weird engine.

William Johnson
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"Our goal is that you will not have to touch the manual camera controls even once to play through the main story path of this game"

I've heard these words before...I mean sure, from lesser developers. I don't want to name any names...but they might be Canadian and have the initials SK...

Facetious comments aside, I just hope that doesn't mean they're going to take out manual controls. Cameras are one of the hardest things to do in 3D games. When I hear developers say they've got it this time and its perfect then remove the function to control the camera...well...bad things happen.

Anyway, the first Epic Mickey was a delightful surprise, and I was REALLY worried about the future of Disney's game studios after I heard they closed down Black Rock.

Jonathan Jennings
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agreed William I know myself even the toughest manual cameras are easier for me to adjust to but when you have an auto-camera 9 times out of 10 bad things happen . people don't complain because manual cameras exist we complain when it feels we are under constant readjustment. to me the simplest way to address something like that is have a one button auto-correct feature based on the direction the player character is looking . not so easy to implement i'm sure but it makes the camera readjustment process faster , easier, and it still allows the user to ultimately retain control of the camera. Also I think sometimes we forget level design definitely affects camera control winding levels may look fantastic but the player should not have to re-orientate incessantly to face the levels objective / goal / end point in question .

not an easy issue to fix by any means BUT I 'll take a manual camera over an auto-camera any day .

Emmanuel Henne
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Thats one opinion. I liked it quite much, the atmosphere, feeling and execution was mostly good, the camera, well, I played games with worse cameras :)

Patrick Davis
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I had a great time with it overall. I wasn't expecting the game to be halfway challenging. Yeah, it was a bit repetitive, but the aesthetics made it easy to deal with. I barely even noticed the camera issues. There are games much worse in the camera department out there. All that said, turning it into a full fleged musical is nothing I'm interested in.


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