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December 12, 2018
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Harm-Jan Wiechers's Blog

 

I’m Harm-Jan Wiechers and I love making music and producing audio for games. The seeds for this love were planted a long ago when I would spend days playing Playstation 1 games like Spyro and Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater, or going through the large pile of demo disc my uncle brought over. I then got to expand my love for games with my interest in music and sound when I started taking guitar lessons; classical at first but that switched over to electric soon. It didn’t dawn on me that I could be doing something professionally with either of these hobbies until I found out about the Hanze University of Applied Science and their 4 year game design and development course. During this time I got to learn about game design and serious game design in a professional setting, but I also noticed a huge lack of audio focused theory and lessons at the school. I took it upon myself to learn as much as I could about that by focusing on audio design and production each time a new project started. I taught myself to produce music and sound effects with FL studio, record voice overs, and implement them in Unity. This was all through trial and error and a whole lot of YouTube tutorials and Gamasutra articles. At the end of the 3rd year of college, I decided I wanted to start my own company, and at the end of the 4th  year I released my first game with two college friends: Super Flippin’ Phones. I then continued to do freelance audio work, creating music and sound effects for multiple different projects ranging from VR training simulations for the wind energy sector, to small mobile titles.

 

Member Blogs

Posted by Harm-Jan Wiechers on Thu, 06 Jul 2017 10:24:00 EDT in Audio, Design, Indie
Or: how less is more when it comes to music and emotions. NITW uses its soundtrack to create emotions in players in a subtle yet powerful way. Here I'll show some examples and give my opinion on why subtlety is so powerful!


Posted by Harm-Jan Wiechers on Mon, 30 Jan 2017 10:35:00 EST in Design
Imagine a player experience you want to create, and use that as a base for your design. In this post, I'll explain some of the advantages and give examples of how we used this way of thinking in Game Jam games.


Posted by Harm-Jan Wiechers on Fri, 22 Jan 2016 01:57:00 EST in Audio, Design
Can music influence the perception of difficulty? In this post, I'll summarize my thesis on the subject of music and perception.