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Richard Vaught's Blog

 

I am currently a student at UAT majoring in Game Design. My background in gaming originally began with classic board and card games. Eventually, I moved on to writing my own stuff on an old Comodore 64 and a lightning fast Tandy TRS80. In the mid-90's I took a break from video games to focus on table top RPG's like D&D and White Wolf, and in 99 developed an unpublished D10 table top RPG while studying music at Troy State University.

After taking a rather extended break in which I blew stuff up in Iraq and sailed the seven seas for a seismic research company, I am now once more pursuing my dream to produce kick ass mind breaking games for people to enjoy.

My main goal as a up and coming Game Designer is to focus on areas generally left out of mainstream gaming, including elements that are often overlook or sacrificed for the sake of flashy glitz... VIVA LA 8-BIT!!!

 

Member Blogs

Posted by Richard Vaught on Mon, 24 Feb 2014 09:11:00 EST in Design, Production, Art
An interview with Tammy McDonald, spokesperson for Axis Game Factory, the creative team behind the new Unity software, AGFPRO.


Posted by Richard Vaught on Fri, 09 Nov 2012 07:33:00 EST in Business/Marketing
Follow up to Game Culture and Liberty, focusing on the issue of sexual harassment in game culture.


Posted by Richard Vaught on Thu, 08 Nov 2012 12:29:00 EST in Business/Marketing, Social/Online
Abusive pricing practices in F2P market and their analog in the Atari generation of console gaming, and why this market will collapse if this is not addressed.


Posted by Richard Vaught on Tue, 18 Sep 2012 01:31:00 EDT in Business/Marketing
A response to the current problems of sexism and harassment in the gaming industry.


Posted by Richard Vaught on Mon, 01 Aug 2011 11:24:00 EDT in Design, Indie
A continuation of my Power of Change series, this time narrowing the focus to deal with equipment design and player created content within that realm.


Posted by Richard Vaught on Sat, 30 Jul 2011 09:42:00 EDT in Design, Indie
What makes games like Dwarf Fortress so fascinating to play? What is the dividing line between reality and games? Change...



Richard Vaught's Comments

Comment In: [Blog - 04/09/2014 - 10:54]

Suppose schools ease up on ...

Suppose schools ease up on the grading system to lean more towards something that rewards excelling instead of punishing those who can 't keep up. It 'll stop the countless students who give up because they think they can only fail. r n r nThis is where you go wrong, ...

Comment In: [Blog - 04/04/2014 - 04:14]

I think you are falling ...

I think you are falling into a trap of absolutionism. Not all pre-packed games are a waste of money, and there will always be a place for people wanting to have the disc on their shelf. Free-To-Play is not inherently evil, though it is much abused at the moment. Kickstarter ...

Comment In: [News - 03/20/2013 - 05:30]

1. It doesn 't, but ...

1. It doesn 't, but then, neither do the comments themselves, regardless of intent. Any designer worth his salt knows that HOW you deliver a message is just as important as important, if not more so, then the message itself. r n r n2. I 'm a designer. I can ...

Comment In: [Blog - 03/07/2013 - 02:44]

As an online student, this ...

As an online student, this article hits really close to home. One thing that I have noticed that could be really improved upon in the classroom is in terms of pre-requisites. In a game, we always ensure that the player receives an upgrade and then has a chance to learn ...

Comment In: [News - 11/09/2012 - 07:19]

Young designers should be taking ...

Young designers should be taking notes :P now where did I put that notebook....

Comment In: [Blog - 11/07/2012 - 09:12]

One of the things I ...

One of the things I have always appreciated about rouge-like games and others where losing is an expected part of the game is that it teaches a certain level of resilience and 'sticktoitiveness '. I see a lot of gamers giving up in situations where gamers used to these types ...